cwd

Cooking with Dog!

Well don’t judge it from the title. Luckily this isn’t a cookbook, it’s a cooking show. There’s a lovely woman who does most of the cooking with the Dog, the not so silent star of the show. He’s a poodle and he narrates the show in perfectly dubbed English!

Has your kitchen been empty since moving to Japan? Have you exhausted the flavors of instant ramen available at your local konbinni? Have you ever been to the grocery store here in Japan and just left with the frozen staples of things like pizza and chicken nuggets? Have you bought it and had no idea what it was while hoping that it wouldn’t make you gag when you heated it up? Tired of eating cold sushi? Or worse have your favorite frozen foods been on the tainted list and you’ve not even known! And all this for the sake to try something different? Ever wish dogs could talk and give you directions? Well, those days can now be over.

Find out how to make those delicious Japanese savories you’ve discovered while eating out. Learn the ingredients and what to buy the next time you are at the store, so you can go home and start mixing it up yourself. Brighten up your kitchen, roll up your sleeves, and get cooking with the Dog!

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http://jp.youtube.com/user/cookingwithdog

  • Robert

    Hello.

    I think you should not directly translate the Japanese food names into English. This is very confusing!! As an example: okonomiyaki. If you state that okonomiyaki is “a Japanese savoury pancake containing a variety of ingredients” the reader, who is unfamiliar with Japanese food, will wonder “where is the maple syrup?”

    The same goes for calling an onigiri a “rice ball”. There are basketballs, tennis balls, table tennis balls, baseballs and rice balls (rice is an integral part of the Japanese diet; it makes sense to make balls out of rice!!)

    A rice cake? Chocolate, vanilla, cheese or strawberry? A cake made with rice flour?

    I always suggest, to my students that instead of translating Japanese food into English, just describe what the food is. As an example: okonomiyaki is a grilled food made of the following ingredients (flour, grated yam, water, dried tuna and water-soaked kelp (dashi), eggs and shredded cabbage, and usually contains other ingredients such as green onion, meat (generally pork or bacon), octopus, squid, shrimp, vegetables, kimchi, mochi (glutinous rice) or cheese.) The batter is mixed, and then grilled on a skillet.

    These may seem verbose, but it is better than confusing and angering native English speakers who think it is better just to describe what the food is.

    What do you think?

  • Robert

    Hello.

    I think you should not directly translate the Japanese food names into English. This is very confusing!! As an example: okonomiyaki. If you state that okonomiyaki is “a Japanese savoury pancake containing a variety of ingredients” the reader, who is unfamiliar with Japanese food, will wonder “where is the maple syrup?”

    The same goes for calling an onigiri a “rice ball”. There are basketballs, tennis balls, table tennis balls, baseballs and rice balls (rice is an integral part of the Japanese diet; it makes sense to make balls out of rice!!)

    A rice cake? Chocolate, vanilla, cheese or strawberry? A cake made with rice flour?

    I always suggest, to my students that instead of translating Japanese food into English, just describe what the food is. As an example: okonomiyaki is a grilled food made of the following ingredients (flour, grated yam, water, dried tuna and water-soaked kelp (dashi), eggs and shredded cabbage, and usually contains other ingredients such as green onion, meat (generally pork or bacon), octopus, squid, shrimp, vegetables, kimchi, mochi (glutinous rice) or cheese.) The batter is mixed, and then grilled on a skillet.

    These may seem verbose, but it is better than confusing and angering native English speakers who think it is better just to describe what the food is.

    What do you think?

  • Jonathan Green

    I think you make a very great point, perhaps you should write an article here on BionicBong about the fine points of language and translation/cooking as you are well on your way already.

    But, I do think that most food and everything else in life is in the details. So, take TexMex for example…It mostly contains all the same ingredients and it’s how you arrange and prepare these that differentiates a soft taco from a burrito or a toastada from nachos.

  • Jonathan Green

    I think you make a very great point, perhaps you should write an article here on BionicBong about the fine points of language and translation/cooking as you are well on your way already.

    But, I do think that most food and everything else in life is in the details. So, take TexMex for example…It mostly contains all the same ingredients and it’s how you arrange and prepare these that differentiates a soft taco from a burrito or a toastada from nachos.

  • Orias

    Wow Robert, your suggestion was terrible. I think if your actually wander around a US grocery store sometime you might be shocked to find out that even Americans can accept that words have slightly different meanings at times.

    Rice Cakes exist already in the American diet. They are often seen as puffed rice and used as a diet food, but Americans are familiar enough with the concept of cakes that are not sweet. I don’t think you need to worry about it blowing our minds. It is actually one of the standard definitions of the world.

    Also, we aren’t Amelia Bedelia we aren’t going to hear “rice ball” and think you go play sports with it. There may be a lot of stupid people on this world, but I think few would reach that level of idiocy.

    One of the best things about the english language is how well it can adapt foreign concepts into itself. I agree that it’s worthwhile to learn the original names, but laundry listing off the ingredients everytime you mention the food would be inane. Finding a comparable item is perfectly valid.

  • Orias

    Wow Robert, your suggestion was terrible. I think if your actually wander around a US grocery store sometime you might be shocked to find out that even Americans can accept that words have slightly different meanings at times.

    Rice Cakes exist already in the American diet. They are often seen as puffed rice and used as a diet food, but Americans are familiar enough with the concept of cakes that are not sweet. I don’t think you need to worry about it blowing our minds. It is actually one of the standard definitions of the world.

    Also, we aren’t Amelia Bedelia we aren’t going to hear “rice ball” and think you go play sports with it. There may be a lot of stupid people on this world, but I think few would reach that level of idiocy.

    One of the best things about the english language is how well it can adapt foreign concepts into itself. I agree that it’s worthwhile to learn the original names, but laundry listing off the ingredients everytime you mention the food would be inane. Finding a comparable item is perfectly valid.

  • http://misterjun.wordpress.com/ Ken

    I’m with Orias and I’m quite baffled at your suggestion. In most cooking circles, terms like “rice cake” are used quite commonly. Okonomiyaki is often described as a sort of pancake. So I think a lot of people would be confused if you start describing these recipes so verbosely.

    And I don’t think people think ‘maple syrup’ when something is described as ‘savory’. If I were to say red pepper paste would you connect that with toothpaste? I’m sure loads of people think a rice ball is used in an organized sport…

    I’m pretty sure it doesn’t ‘anger’ native English speakers. If it does, then someone needs to take the stick out of their butt.

  • http://misterjun.wordpress.com Ken

    I’m with Orias and I’m quite baffled at your suggestion. In most cooking circles, terms like “rice cake” are used quite commonly. Okonomiyaki is often described as a sort of pancake. So I think a lot of people would be confused if you start describing these recipes so verbosely.

    And I don’t think people think ‘maple syrup’ when something is described as ‘savory’. If I were to say red pepper paste would you connect that with toothpaste? I’m sure loads of people think a rice ball is used in an organized sport…

    I’m pretty sure it doesn’t ‘anger’ native English speakers. If it does, then someone needs to take the stick out of their butt.

  • Rachel

    Anyone who thinks riceball is sport orientated shouldnt be in a kitchen. Or let alone cooking. Cooks, even mom cooks, have an open idea to a world of foods. Like on “Rattatoulie” anyone can cook, but it doesnt mean they should.

  • Rachel

    Anyone who thinks riceball is sport orientated shouldnt be in a kitchen. Or let alone cooking. Cooks, even mom cooks, have an open idea to a world of foods. Like on “Rattatoulie” anyone can cook, but it doesnt mean they should.

  • Bill

    My wife is Japanese but she can’t cook so I’m often referring her to cooking with dog. From experience, her (cooking with dog) healthy gyudon is great. We also tried her sukiyaki which was also good. The neighbor girl who was eating together with our daughter, told my wife that she cooks better than her mother.

    On the debate of translating dishes, it’s probably best to not. If I say to my friend, “Hey let’s go eat okonomiyaki.” and my friend says, “What’s that.” “Oh it’s Japanese pancakes.” I think my friend is going to be a little surprised to see mayonnaise, seaweed, and all the other myriad of stuff put on and in this “pancake.” Beside a Japanese pancake is called hottokeki (hot cake). Besides, lots of foods aren’t translated, ramen, soba, sushi etc. Finally, onigiri = rice ball is a little off. Rice ball sounds unappetizing and uninvented but onigiri are appetizing and come in a huge variety–a sort of Japanese sandwich invented before bread. Growing up with Vietnamese friends, I often got harassed by racist idiots who would say to me, “why do you hang out with Tom; don’t you know gooks only eat fish heads and rice balls?” So it’s always grating to hear people call an onigiri a rice ball.

  • Bill

    My wife is Japanese but she can’t cook so I’m often referring her to cooking with dog. From experience, her (cooking with dog) healthy gyudon is great. We also tried her sukiyaki which was also good. The neighbor girl who was eating together with our daughter, told my wife that she cooks better than her mother.

    On the debate of translating dishes, it’s probably best to not. If I say to my friend, “Hey let’s go eat okonomiyaki.” and my friend says, “What’s that.” “Oh it’s Japanese pancakes.” I think my friend is going to be a little surprised to see mayonnaise, seaweed, and all the other myriad of stuff put on and in this “pancake.” Beside a Japanese pancake is called hottokeki (hot cake). Besides, lots of foods aren’t translated, ramen, soba, sushi etc. Finally, onigiri = rice ball is a little off. Rice ball sounds unappetizing and uninvented but onigiri are appetizing and come in a huge variety–a sort of Japanese sandwich invented before bread. Growing up with Vietnamese friends, I often got harassed by racist idiots who would say to me, “why do you hang out with Tom; don’t you know gooks only eat fish heads and rice balls?” So it’s always grating to hear people call an onigiri a rice ball.

  • Bisque

    I love this show!! its makes it so much easier eating Japanese food at home than to go out to the restaurant on days when I feel like staying in

  • Kjaskjak

    Robert, the problem may be in your head.

  • Kjaskjak

    Robert, the problem may be in your head.

  • FEFO

    PICKLES JAPONESES

  • Ann Shiogi

    Cooking with Dog is one of my favorite YouTube cooking shows. I have learned so much about Japanese cooking and culture. My other favorite is runnyrunny999. He mentioned CWD chef is not feeling well. I hope you will get well soon. Ann

  • http://www.ecommerce-web-developers.com/ ecommerce development

    That sounds very unique anyways all the best for you cooking with the dog.

  • http://www.buyanessay.com/buy-custom-essay.html buy custom essays online

    Oh crap, thats nice. Cooking japaneese foods with dog that speaking in english O_O
    I can’t imagine awesomiest thing.