Tag Archives: Haruki Murakami

Haruki Murakami – Next novel has 500,000 pre-release print run

The eagerly-awaited new novel from Haruki Murakami set for release this week will have an initial hardback printrun of half a million copies, the Japanese publisher said Tuesday.

The new novel is expected to hit bookstores on Friday, with major outlets planning to open early at 8:00 am (2300 GMT, Thursday), while at least one large seller in Tokyo will fling open its doors at midnight.

Online book giant Amazon Japan had received more than 20,000 pre-orders for the new novel as of Saturday, faster than any other book by Murakami, publishing house Bungeishunju Ltd. said.

Half a million copies is the largest initial hardback printrun for the Japanese publisher, one of the country’s biggest.

The new book’s title is only available in Japanese for now: “Shikisai wo Motanai Tazaki Tsukuru to Kare no Junrei no Toshi.” An unofficial translation renders it: “Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and the Year of his Pilgrimage.”

Read the rest of the story: Murakami novel has 500,000 pre-release print run.

Lost for Haruki Murakami

I prepared for my first-ever trip to Japan, this summer, almost entirely by immersing myself in the work of Haruki Murakami. This turned out to be a horrible idea. Under the influence of Murakami, I arrived in Tokyo expecting Barcelona or Paris or Berlin — a cosmopolitan world capital whose straight-talking citizens were fluent not only in English but also in all the nooks and crannies of Western culture: jazz, theater, literature, sitcoms, film noir, opera, rock ’n’ roll. But this, as really anyone else in the world could have told you, is not what Japan is like at all. Japan — real, actual, visitable Japan — turned out to be intensely, inflexibly, unapologetically Japanese.

Read the rest of the story: The Fierce Imagination of Haruki Murakami.

Novelist Murakami criticizes Japan’s nuclear policy and donates prize to survivors

BARCELONA, Spain — Novelist Haruki Murakami criticized his country’s pursuit of nuclear energy Thursday during his acceptance speech at the 2011 International Catalunya Prize ceremony in Barcelona, describing the ongoing crisis at the quake-crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant as "a mistake committed by our very own hands."

Murakami said Japan, as the only nation to have experienced the devastation and suffering from radiation through World War II atomic bombings, should have continued saying "no" to nuclear power.

Read the rest of the story: Novelist Murakami slams nuclear policy.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=FM_AdpzTtYg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=nui_LBMUgps

1Q84 – Murakami Speaks About the Unreal

In the chaotic world after the Cold War and the September 11 2001 attacks, Japanese author Haruki Murakami says metaphors can be even more powerful than what’s real — a reason why his surreal books are read worldwide.

“I think people are gradually starting to understand and accept the realness of unreal things,” Murakami, one of the most widely read Japanese novelists in the world, told Reuters in a rare media interview.

“While it is necessary to write about the post-Cold War ways of the world, no matter how realistically it may be written, it can’t be expressed sufficiently. The only way it could be written about is through metaphors,” he said.

The 60-year-old novelist, a regular in Nobel literature prize predictions, has been writing in Japanese for three decades. His novels, short stories and essays have been translated into more than 40 languages.

In May, he published the two-volume, 1,055-page novel “1Q84,” a title suggestive of George Orwell’s “1984” as the Japanese word for 9 is pronounced the same as the English letter “Q.”

“First, there was George Orwell’s 1984, a novel about the near future… I wanted to write something that was the opposite of that, a novel on the recent past that shows how things could have been,” Murakami said.

The book alternates chapters between two characters, a female named Aomame and a male named Tengo. It deals with themes such as cults and abuse, loss, as well as sex, love and murder.

Incidents such as the September 11 attacks on U.S. cities and the Tokyo subway gas attack in 1995 by a religious cult drove Murakami to write the novel.

“To me, 9/11 does not feel like an incident that took place in the real world. Somewhere, there must be a world in which this didn’t happen,” he said.

“I am always doubtful about whether this world that I am in now is the real one. Somewhere in me, I feel there is a world that may not have been this way.”

Over 2.2 million copies of “1Q84” had been printed in Japan as of October.

For more of the interview: Japan’s Murakami says metaphor more real after 9/11

Source: Yahoo
Photo: Reuters