Tag Archives: Japan Power Shortage

Japan Aims to Triple Wind Power Capacity

The government aims to triple the nation’s supply capacity of electricity generated through wind power to 7.5 million kilowatts by developing transmission grids in Hokkaido and the Tohoku region, it has been learned.

Under a decadelong project the government will launch in fiscal 2013, which starts in April, the public and private sectors will spend about 310 billion yen (S$4.1 billion) on development.

Wind is considered a key source for increasing the proportion of renewable energy because it can generate a great deal of power at one site and is less expensive than solar and geothermal power.

The government estimates that wind power generation cost just about 10 yen per kilowatt hour as of 2010–almost the same as thermal power generation by liquefied natural gas.

However, wind-generated power in Japan amounted to 179.63 million kilowatt-hours in fiscal 2011–less than 0.1 per cent of the nation’s total power production.

Read the rest of the story: Japan aims to triple wind power.

Japan powering up nuclear reactor amid protests

Energy-starved Japan will regain nuclear-powered electricity on Sunday, as the first reactor to be switched on since last year’s Fukushima disaster comes online.

Kansai Electric Power Co. Ltd. KEPCO said the No. 3 reactor at the country’s Ohi Nuclear Power Plant will be activated on July 1 and start providing electricity to western Japan — which includes Osaka, Japan’s second biggest city by July 4. Ohi’s No. 4 reactor is also scheduled to resume operations by July 24th.

Read the rest of the story: Japan set to power up nuclear reactor amid protests.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-QIuqsqTgbo&feature=player_embedded

Solar Boom Heads to Japan – Incentives starting July 1st to drive sales

Japan is poised to overtake Germany and Italy to become the world’s second-biggest market for solar power as incentives starting July 1 drive sales for equipment makers from Yingli Green Energy Holdings Co. to Kyocera Corp.

Industry Minister Yukio Edano today may set a premium price for solar electricity that’s about triple what industrial users now pay for conventional power, a ministry official said. That may spur at least $9.6 billion in new installations with 3.2 gigawatts of capacity, Bloomberg New Energy Finance forecast. The total is about equal to the output of three atomic reactors.

“The tariff is very attractive,” said Mina Sekiguchi, associate partner and head of energy and infrastructure at KPMG in Japan. “The rate reflects the government’s intention to set up many solar power stations very quickly.”

Read the rest of the story: Solar Boom Heads to Japan Creating $9.6 Billion Market: Energy.

Japan Approves Two Reactor Restarts

Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda, his popularity ratings sagging, had backed the restarts for some time. He announced the government’s decision at a meeting with keep ministers, giving the go-ahead to two reactors operated by Kansai Electric Power Co at Ohi in western Japan.

The decision, despite public concerns over safety after the big earthquake and tsunami crippled the Fukushima plant, could open the door to more restarts among Japan’s 50 nuclear power reactors.

Read the rest of the story: Japan Approves Two Reactor Restarts, More Seen Ahead.

First Nuclear Reactor Since Japan’s March 11th Disaster Restarts

A nuclear reactor in western Japan began starting back up on Tuesday after a month’s hiatus, the first reactor in the country closed for any reason to win approval from a local government to resume operations since the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

Since the March 11 earthquake and tsunami that set off the nuclear disaster, a popular backlash against nuclear power has halted the reopening of reactors closed because of damage at the time or unrelated glitches, or for routine inspections. Regulations require reactors to close at least every 13 months for checks, meaning more and more reactors have gone out of service, with none allowed to restart — until Tuesday.

Only 10 of Japan’s 54 reactors are now generating electricity, a sharp reduction for an industry that once supplied 30 percent of the country’s electricity. The shortfall in supply forced the Tokyo Electric Power Company to tell companies to slash energy use by 15 percent this summer.

Read the rest of the story: Reactor in Japan Restarts, a First Since the Tsunami.