Tag Archives: Japan Renewable Energy Law

Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariff Era Begins in Japan

The feed-in tariff system for renewable energies entered into force Sunday to help promote their use and cut Japan’s dependency on nuclear power.

The system requires utilities to purchase all electricity generated through solar, wind, water and geothermal power, among other eco-friendly sources, at fixed rates for up to 20 years. The costs will be passed onto consumers.

The government’s generous tariff rates have created considerable interest in the sector, with companies rushing to build massive solar and other power plants based on renewable energies.

Read the rest of the story: Feed-in tariff era gets under way.

Japan Set To Introduce Landmark Renewable Energy Law

Japan’s parliament is set to approve a landmark bill on renewable energy championed by Prime Minister Naoto Kan as a way to reduce the nation’s dependence on nuclear power following the worst nuclear plant accident in the country’s history, and which would break the monopoly of the 10 major utilities.

The final passage of the bill, which aims to bolster investment in renewable energy, is expected by the end of the month. Ironically, it paves the way for the highly unpopular Kan to step down.

Its main feature is a requirement that utilities purchase power from outside providers such as private companies or cooperatives under certain circumstances. This is seen as opening the door for much greater use of renewable energy, an area where Japan lags, accounting for just 9% of total supply.

Read the rest of the story: Japan Set To Introduce Landmark Renewable Energy Law.